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20121205
20121213
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the fiscal cliff, the deal getting closer to balance the budget is still very important. i do hope because of the discussion that tax reform is something that is taken seriously for this year. i think that is well overdue. there is not time to do it before december 31. it will give businesses a lot of assurances that the government is paying attention to what they are saying. >> you should tell barack obama to find a jim baker. >> think about each time we have reached a crisis point in our country there's been an institutional response to it. we created a central bank. that has proved to be enormous for the past five years and important for years before that. post-world war ii, we create a system and the department of homeland security. i wonder if there's not an institutional -- >> some did not work as well as others. >> that is exactly right. it reflects our values and the focus of the government. we should have a department of homeland prosperity. we need somebody other than the president to think about american competitiveness. something we've taken for granted because we were the prem
year, two years, i do think obviously getting over the fiscal cliff the deal, getting closer to balancing the budget, which i think is still very important in the mindset of businesses and this government, that we learn to do that. but i do hope because of all the discussion that tax reform is something that is taken seriously for this year. i think it's well overdue. it's been posited as something that should be done now. it's obviously doesn't have time to do it before december 31. i think that there's a real opportunity to make a lot of the changes that we have talked with through -- about through tax reform. and it will give businesses a lot of the assurances they need that the government is paying attention. >> you should tell barack obama to find a jim baker, then. >> i have an idea for you. which is, this is -- if you think about each time we reached a crisis point of enormous proportions in our country, there's been an institutional response toe it. we had a number financial crises through the late 1800's early 1900's, we create add central bank. and that has proved t
briefing, that reaching a deal on the fiscal cliff before christmas would be difficult. this is 10 minutes. >> speaker boehner said he'd waiting on president obecause mo -- obama to outline the spending cuts. that's a strange thing for the speaker to say. president obama outlined specific cuts in his proposal to the republicans. while republicans have not offered anything specific in cuts whatsoever, and of course nothing specific in revenue whatsoever. all generalizations. the republicans want more spending cuts, tell us what you want. that's what i say to them. we can't read their minds. we're not going to make the proposal for them. republicans know perfectly well that democrats are willing to make tough choices on these issues, if in fact they understand, which i hope they do by now, that we're going to look out for the middle class first. the only thing standing in the way of an agreement is republicans. their insistence on holding tax cuts for middle class families hostage to the fiscal cliff. there's a lot of bluster coming from republicans but that facade is crumbling quickly. ever
a deal on this fiscal cliff. the reality is that will there are few members of this house who probably are in discussions with the white house about trying to work out a deal, but the vast majority here, democrats and republicans, are being asked to do nothing. last night we came back and we voted on a -- to approve the journal, that's all we had to do last night. to approve the journal. we haven't re-authorized the violence against women act. we haven't extended middle class tax cuts. we haven't re-authorized the farm bill. i could go on and on, but we had to come back to vote on a -- have a journal vote last night. the time has come for us to get back to work. the election was clear. the election was clear. the views advocated by governor romney anti-republican majority were rejected. the president won comfortably, and we did -- democrats won more seats in the senate, we won more seats here in the house. i think it's a pretty clear message that the american people think that we ought to do what's right in terms of balancing the budget and that is ask the donnell trumps of the world t
principles. host: do they believe a recession could happen if we fall off the so called "fiscal cliff?" guest: they do. what we saw last year is business leaders were concerned that washington was not going to come together with a deal. and that it could end badly, but it was a more muted concern. they just trusted washington would get it done. given how quickly things happened last time, they are taking a much more active role. business leaders have come to washington to require a minimum height standard for the ride of the fiscal cliff. they want to make sure that members of either party who are speaking out are as close as possible to simpson-bowles. talk about real cuts, about real revenue. it's much more and ownership in the process this time. host: where does your group come down on regulations? guest: our job is to go out and get business leaders around the country more involved. the business leaders speak for themselves. business leaders are generally extremely influential in their home markets. there are the kind of people if that can give a member of congress moderate republican or
. >> the joint economic committee today heard from the two economists on how to deal with the fiscal cliff. marchese said tax increases are necessary to reduce the deficit. senator bob casey of pennsylvania chaired the hearing. >> the committee will come to order. we want to thank everyone for being here today. i did not have a chance to personally greet our witnesses, but i will have time to do that later. i want to thank both of our witnesses for being here. i will have an opening statement that i will make, and then i will turn it to dr. burgess. i know that vice chairman brady will be her as well. we know the challenges that we confront here in congress on a whole range of issues which are sometimes broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff -- when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we kn
back in session on december 17 to disco -- deal with the fiscal cliff. the house will not adjourn until an agreement is reached on preventing spending cuts and tax increases scheduled to take effect on january. on washington journal" we have been looking elements of the so- called fiscal cliff -- a discussion of the expiring tax provisions set to hit january 1. host: we have been focusing on different parts of the fiscal cliff discussion. today we're looking at tax extenders for businesses and individuals. joining us is sam goldfarb, a tax writer for cq roll call. what our tax extenders? guest: they are temporary tax breaks. some people are concerned the entire tax code is turning into a big tax extender. they are considered to be a small provision and targeted at specific types of businesses. host: why are they temporary? guest: a lot of people say they should be made permanent or they should be eliminated altogether. it is easier to pass when they are temporary. they keep on being extended and extended. host: we will look at some of these. these are some of the tax extenders and the c
meaningful conversations in a variety of subjects. i was going to deal with that problem with the fiscal cliff today, but gun violence is another area in america where it seems we can't have a discussion without delusional claims of overreach and taking away hunting rifles. congress won't even allow statistics on gun violence to be gathered, and we certainly have made no progress towards closing the gun show loophole. i come to the floor with a small array of hope. with nearly half of all military sue sides are committed with privately owned weapons, the pentagon and congress are moving towards establishing policies to separate at-risk service members from personal private weapons. congress is poised to enact legislation to end a prohibition about the military collecting information about firearms kept at home. these are simple commonsense steps for an armed services where more military personnel take their own life than who die in battle. perhaps if we can take these reasonable steps to protect our servicemen and their families, perhaps we can have the courage to treat the epidemic of g
're really talking about as part of the fiscal cliff. >> that is what might be cut. that is what automatically expires. we know it cost $30 billion to continue additional unemployment benefits. of the deal i want to make, the benefits should continue. firm stand. we have seen in the past obama host: what specific benefits do guest: usually some kind of a cash benefit or they may help the search for a job. it is usually about $300 a week. it can vary from state sen. in the mississippi i want to say it is closer to $200. host: how are the programs funded? payroll taxes. through the trust the state administers the program and the money goes to the unemployed. host: talk about qualifications order to apply? guest: generally what you have to do is you have to have a year certain threshold. you have to have been let go from a job. and necessarily qualify for -- to qualify for unemployment benefits. if he graduated from college and do not have a job, you getit is a pretty easy system to get into if you were laid off after 10 years. host: we have some qualifications a person must meet on
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9